Tag: haunted

“I Lived in a Haunted House”

“I Lived in a Haunted House”

Or, What Made me Believe in Ghosts

I’m not the kind of person who looks for evidence of the supernatural. I love to read and write about it. My favorite TV shows all have paranormal and supernatural themes (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Vampire Diaries, Teen Wolf), but I never had a concrete stance on whether ghosts are real until I moved into a haunted house.

In 2008 my husband, our daughter, and I moved to Ogden, Utah into a sixty-plus-year-old home. We were native southern Californians and this was our first experience living in the Beehive State. My husband’s job transferred him to nearby Roy and we were excited to find a cheap house within fifteen minutes of his office.

The house has a main floor plus a full basement that can be used as a “grandma apartment” with its own kitchenette and bathroom, and an attic with two bedrooms and a bathroom. Though there were only three of us, it was perfect. We could have a playroom for our daughter, a rumpus room downstairs, and both my husband and I could have our own home offices. I loved it.

Haunted House
The basement is level with the car. The main floor is in brick. The attic is above that. The garages are in the back.

The first unusual experience happened almost immediately. At the rear of the property was an older garage with a much newer garage addition built onto the side. I adopted the older garage, but when we moved in it looked like it hadn’t been used in decades. It was coated with dust and cobwebs. Someone had dug their own mechanic’s pit into the ground and miscellaneous car parts and shop tools were rusting in drawers and cabinets. The first thing I did was cover the mechanic’s pit and clear out the space from top to bottom so I could park my car inside without being afraid of breathing in the Hanta virus.

Old Garage
What the garages looked like before we moved in. The old one is to the right. You can see part of the newer addition on the left.

After a rough day of cleaning I was standing in the doorway of the old garage and I saw a man behind me, to my right, on the edge of my peripheral vision. Scared that a nosy neighbor had snuck up on me, I spun around. No one was there.

My little girl is standing in the same spot I was when I saw someone who wasn't really there.
My little girl is standing in the same spot I was when I saw someone who wasn’t really there. The old garage is on the left. The newer one is to the right.

The kitchen on the main floor didn’t usually have any supernatural or scary vibes. But one day my three-year-old daughter and I returned to an empty house. With her in the lead, we rounded a corner into the kitchen. Something by the windows caught her eye and she called out, “Hi, ghost.”

I'm writing at the kitchen table in front of the windows where my daughter saw someone.
I’m writing at the kitchen table in front of the windows where my daughter saw someone.

There was no one in the house but us and I didn’t see anything. When I asked her what she’d seen to make her say that she didn’t want to talk about it.

My daughter is making a potion with her grandma while I cook dinner in front of the windows that spooked my little girl.
My daughter is making a potion with her grandma while I cook dinner in front of the windows that spooked my little girl.

The worst area of the house, though, was the attic. When we bought the property the previous owners, who’d only lived there two years, had been using the adorable attic bedrooms—with their hand built shelves, wood paneling, and sloping ceilings—as storage space. I couldn’t understand why!

As soon as we moved in I swept the two rooms and spread out my daughter’s impressive toy collection, made curtains for the windows, and lay down large play rugs. I couldn’t wait to spend hours of fun, imaginative play in there.

Except no one ever wanted to go up there.

The attic. Here is my daughter and her friend playing in the pirate ship playroom I made for her (complete with canvas sail and freestanding ship's wheel). This is the room my brother slept in. Once.
The attic. Here is my daughter and her friend playing in the pirate ship playroom I made for her (complete with canvas sail and freestanding ship’s wheel). This is the room my brother slept in. Once. See the light spot in the background?

One reason, which has nothing to do with the paranormal is, heat rises. During the summer the attic was the hottest level of the house. Beyond that, though, I always got a bad feeling up there. The stairs leading into the attic were narrow, steep, and covered in thick green carpet. I slipped on them at least a dozen times in the three years we lived there. My daughter fell so badly once, while carrying a play set down, that she still remembers it six years later. When I used those stairs I purposefully gripped the banister tight and planted my feet solidly on each step because it became an almost certainty that if I wasn’t paying attention I’d slip. Especially on the way down.

And the attic stairs were always cold. Winter or summer, it didn’t matter; they were colder than the rest of the house.

All those toys in the attic used to power on constantly and randomly. My daughter still has a lot of battery powered toys and I can honestly say, except for Zhu-Zhu pets that come on if something touches them, none of them power on by themselves. None. But in the attic, toys would sing and light up and talk without human interference all the time. We just got used to hearing the little piano start playing music, or the animatronic bear say, “I love you,” or the electronic book sing the Alphabet Song. At any time of the day or night.

When we had overnight guests I set them up in the attic. They would have privacy and their own bathroom. So when my brother came to stay for Thanksgiving I made a place for him in the attic. I didn’t say anything to him about the strange feelings I got up there because I didn’t think he’d believe me and I also didn’t want to influence him. Maybe it was just me.

Haunted House Edited
The red arrow points to the attic window of the room my brother slept in. The blue arrow points to my brother, yes, but also the front door I heard open and close from my spot in the basement below.

The next morning he described his night spent in my attic. First, the plastic vanity against the wall turned on and flashed its lights and played a bright, tinny melody. He hadn’t touched it, even by accident. Once he’d actually fallen asleep he said he woke up to a man bending over him, his twisted and angry face inches from my brother’s.

My brother wouldn’t sleep in the attic again after that. When he visited next time he slept on the pull-out couch in the basement and was much happier.

The final incident I can share happened over the summer when my mother-in-law, sister-in-law, and nephew were visiting. Because it was hot we were all chatting in the rumpus room in the basement. We were directly under the main floor living room.

Keep in mind our house was older and had a lot of wood floors. It made noise—pops and creaks—all the time as it settled, expanded, and constricted in different temperatures. But that day I heard the front door open and close.  My husband always came home through that door, never the basement door, so I knew who it had to be. I remember leaning back my head onto the couch and following the sound of his footsteps as they crossed from the door to our bedroom on the other side of the house.

Excited, I announced, “Sounds like he’s home.” I rushed upstairs to greet him, but the house was empty. The front door was still locked. There was no car in the driveway except mine. There was no one there.

I still haven’t researched the property or its previous owners. Half of me is scared I’ll find nothing. The other half is afraid I’ll discover I was living in some hellish murder house. But I have never had any other supernatural experiences in any other home I’ve ever lived in, and because of my husband’s job I’ve lived in nine different homes since we got engaged.

By the time we moved away that adorable playroom in the attic I’d spent so much time decorating was being used for storage and no one ever went up there unless they had to.

<3 Anna

Top 4 Most Haunted Dehli Sites

Top 4 Most Haunted Dehli Sites

Or, Only Visit These Places During The Day

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Don’t Try After Sunset: The Most Haunted Places in Dehli

Written by Arjun Pandey in Feb. 2016

Delhi, the capital city of India, has more than 1300 monuments. Some of them have deep dark secrets. It is also widely believed that many of them are haunted, harbouring in their shadowy recesses djinns, ghosts, spirits and more. So hold your nerve as we at Delhipedia take you on a tour of the most ghostly corners of the city in our first episode of “Haunted Places in Delhi”.

Agrasen ki Baoli

Agrasen ki Baoli

Built by Maharaja Agrasen during in the mid-14th century, this monument is a 60m-long and 15m-wide classic step-well (baoli). It has 130 steps made of red stone that lead to a water reservoir. The well, though it has now dried out, is said to exert a mesmeric effect that compelled many people to jump to their death. Many swear that the intensity of ‘unnatural vibrations’ increases around you as you go further down near the reservoir. It is also referred to as the ‘Baoli of the Unseen’.

Presently, the rooms considered dangerous are secured with gates. When the baoliwas filled, it contained filthy black water, which fascinated mostly dejected and depressed admirers. The murky, mystic waters apparently exerted a hypnotic pull, compelling those fatally attracted to its dark depths to jump.

Dehli FEROZ-SHAH-KOTLA-FORT
Feroz Shah Kotla Fort

Feroz Shah Kotla Fort

Situated in the heart of the city behind ITO Press Lane and just next to Kotla Cricket Stadium, our [next] stop is Feroz Shah Kotla Fort. As you near the structure — once the headquarters of a dynasty which ruled over north India — the buzz of the city seems to fade into an eerie silence. Built in 1354 by Feroz Shah Tughlaq, it is said to have djinns residing amid its ruins and dark alleys.

Every Thursday, locals can be seen lighting candles and incense sticks in select dark spots, offering bowls of milk and grain to appease the djinns and hoping for their wishes to come true. At times, you can also see mentally disturbed people coming here to find solace. Unlike ghosts, djinns are supposed to be shapeless beings who can marry and also bear children. Distinct from us humans, they are formless and can ‘live’ for many centuries. But like humans and ghosts — and unlike angels– they can be bad and moody. Legend has it that when Iblis, a djinn, refused to bow before Adam, Allah cast him out as the devil. The bad djinns prey on young women, especially if said young women are left unguarded or drying their hair on the roof!

Dehli Jamali-Kamali Masjid
Jamali-Kamali Masjid

Jamali-Kamali Masjid

Notable Sufi saints Jamali and Kamali were buried here in 1535. Today it is believed that this tranquil masjid is haunted by djinns, and many claim to have experienced paranormal activities here. In addition to hearing screaming voices coming out of the graves, on many occasions visitors have complained of being slapped by ‘invisible hands’ or being chased away by ‘mysterious wind’. It is advised not to venture here after sunset, although the screams can apparently be heard even in broad daylight.

According to legend, djinns live in a parallel world to that of humans. It is believed that God created humans out of sand and djinns out of fire. Some djinns are known to be good and others bad. While humans can’t see them, djinns have the power to cross-over between both worlds. Sometimes, djinns step into the human world and decide to stay permanently in abandoned places. This, it is said, is what happened in Jamali Kamali. For so long was the site abandoned that djinns decided it was a safe place to set up house. When annoyed by uninvited human guests, they are not averse to delivering the odd slap.

Dehli Khooni Nadi
Khooni Nadi

Khooni Nadi

Khooni Nadi (Bloody River) in Rohini is believed to be haunted. It is said that the river tries to pull inside whoever enters and many have died. The lives lost here have often been assumed to be suicides but the cases are still mysterious. If you’re ‘lucky’ you may hear crying noises and other spooky sounds near the river.

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<3 Anna

Tuesday Teaser (“The Night Trevor’s Soul Came Loose”)

Tuesday Teaser (“The Night Trevor’s Soul Came Loose”)

Or, Take A Peek At My Short Ghost Story

Teaser 12 Trev

 

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Ghost Photobombs Family Photo

Ghost Photobombs Family Photo

Or, Is This A Photo Of An 8-Foot Tall Ghost?

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Ghost Pictured in Pub Near Henry VIII’s Haunted Palace

Written by Russell Myers in Jan. 2015

ghost photobomb
Teacher Debbie Monteforte took the photo of her husband Alex and their son Raphael at Christmas – but they were in for a shock.

Look very closely and you can see that this pub is a favourite haunt of at least one regular.

For in the top-right corner of the grainy image, a tall ghostly figure is pictured lingering in the background of a happy family snap.

Teacher Debbie Monteforte took the photo of her husband Alex and their son Raphael at Christmas.

A family friend said: “Debbie took the pic and thought nothing of it. But when they looked at it on a computer it was plain to see the haunted face of a woman wearing a long dark coat behind them.

“The family insists there was no one standing behind them and there was no place to hang a coat.

“Even if there was someone standing there, they would have to be 8ft tall to appear like that. It’s beyond spooky.”

The Kings Arms Hotel is one of Britain’s oldest pubs and sits in the shadows of Hampton Court Palace, south west London.

The 300-year-old boozer, near King Henry VIII’s former residence, has a dark past.

In the 19th century, a boy is rumoured to have found his mother hanged in the building. The lad was so disturbed he threw himself out a window and died.

Both “ghosts” of the mum and son are said to have haunted the pub ever since.

A grey-haired lady is also said to appear in a bedroom window.

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See The Haunted Well In A NY Clothing Store

See The Haunted Well In A NY Clothing Store

Or, Shop For Men’s Wear Under The Shadow Of A Haunted Well

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This Clothing Store Features an 18th Century Haunted Well

Written by Cheryl Eddy in Jan. 2015

haunted well

A New York City outpost of clothing store COS has a 200-year-old well tucked into its men’s department. The structure is a remnant of the building’s 18th-century past … and it’s where a woman’s strangled body was discovered in 1799.

Scouting NY (a fascinating, wonderfully detailed blog written by location scout and hidden history enthusiast Nick Carr), weaves the sinister tale:

The well-documented story has it that a young woman named Gulielma Elmore Sands left her Greenwich Street boarding home on the evening of Dec. 22, 1799, to meet Levi Weeks, a fellow boarder. The two had a secret romance and were planning to elope that night. Eleven days later, her body was found in a well in Lispenard’s Meadow (today’s Spring Street). Marks on her neck suggested death by strangulation.

For even more context (the “Manhattan Well Murder” led to a sensational trial and a controversial verdict; defense attorneys included future dueling duo Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, and it was also “the first murder trial in American history to be fully documented by a court stenographer”), check out Carr’s 2011 Wall Street Journal article. He penned it when the infamous SoHo building housed a restaurant. Back then, the well was tucked into a basement that was primarily used for storage, and one had to obtain special permission to view it.

Now, though, the well — long believed to be haunted — is just hangin’ out in the men’s department, providing an awesome staging zone for what look to be otherwise rather minimalist pants and jackets. Carr notes, wryly:

While the only spirit-like entities I saw on my recent visit were a few ghostly mannequins decked out in the latest Swedish fashions, it’s still pretty amazing to be able to check out such a unique piece of New York history, an artifact dating to a time when Soho was a meadow and Spring Street actually had a spring running through it.

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<3 Anna

Free Ebook Correction

Free Ebook Correction

Or, Oops

In case you were waiting for Spell of Summoning (Dark Caster #1) to be free today, it will in fact be free starting tomorrow May 14 and continue until the 18th.

Spell200x300Thanks for understanding!

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Epping Forest’s Haunted History

Epping Forest’s Haunted History

Or, Discover the UK’s Ghostly Forest

Visit the original article here. Or continue reading below for the full story.

Epping Forest’s Haunted History

Written by Joseph Flaig in Dec. 2014

epping forest

Ghostly appearances, spooky sounds and bizarre phenomena that seem to defy the laws of science are all a part of a paranormal legacy in the wild corners of Epping Forest.

The forest’s size, density and proximity to London have made it a popular criminal hideout for centuries, and its dark woods have likely been the site of many hidden burials.

Stories and reports of ghostly sightings in the forest are a source of ongoing fascination, with many groups and organisations showing an active interest in the spooky stories.

In December 2003, an episode of the paranormal investigation show Most Haunted was broadcast live from the forest as the crew apparently pursued the spirit of the infamous highwayman Dick Turpin.

Although he was born in Hempstead around 1705, Turpin is known to have opened a butcher’s shop in Buckhurst Hill and in his later life he was notorious for using the forest as a base for his criminal activities.

He murdered at least one man in the forest, for which he was tried and hanged in York in 1739.

In the live broadcast of Most Haunted, Turpin’s spirit apparently presented itself to Yvette Fielding and led the crew off the path and into the depths of the forest, forcing them to call a forest keeper to rescue them.

They had originally been filming at Loughton Camp, an area of the forest that Turpin used as a hideout and is notorious for paranormal activity.

The site, which is just outside of Loughton, is thought to have been used as an army base by the tribal queen Boudica, and this has led a number of people to think that the spirits and memories of dead soldiers have been left in the area.

Alan Smith, member of the paranormal investigation group Parahauntings UK, said there is a possibility that certain emotions can linger.

He said: “The ‘Stone Tape’ theory suggests that emotions and energy imprints itself on the surroundings in a magnetic way, much like cassette tapes.

“The camp would be an area of very high emotion. Being a war time camp, there would be the emotions of going to war and being worried about not coming back.” He added: “You never know what you could find when you go down there.”

A number of accounts have reported muffled sounds of drums and marching emanating from the forest, and some people believe that this is caused by the spirits of dead soldiers.

Several reports have been made over the years of spirits apparently taking material form.

In the 1960s, there were sightings of ghostly figures emerging from a pond near Lindsey Street in Epping. The figures were said to emerge from the pond on horseback before riding towards town and disappearing.

Another pond at an unknown location deep in the woods is said to draw people to commit suicide in its murky waters, after two young lovers died in a tragic murder-suicide at the pond 300 years ago.

Restless spirits have also been blamed for Epping Forest’s most well known and bizarre supernatural phenomenon that persists to this day: cars appearing to roll uphill at Hangman’s Hill.

If left in neutral, cars left at the bottom of Hangman’s Hill in High Beach appear to defy gravity and roll uphill, and local legend has it that this is the spirit of a hangman dragging an unfortunate criminal to his execution.

A more scientific explanation suggests the phenomenon occurs because of an optical illusion, with the road only appearing to slope upwards.

Despite the mystery of Hangman’s Hill being solved, many people have been left unable to explain their own experiences in the forest and the supernatural legacy of criminal activity and hidden violence persists to this day.

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<3 Anna

Haunted Mansion History Mystery

Haunted Mansion History Mystery

Or, Discover The Origins Of Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion Ride

Visit the original article here. Or continue reading below for the full story.

Haunted Mansion History Mystery

Written by Sara Hofstein in Dec. 2014

haunted savannah 1
Hamilton-Turner House, Savannah, Georgia

 

In Savannah, Georgia, the dead are just as important as the living. Graveyards and majestic homes named after their prominent former owners are found all over Savannah’s downtown area. If you’re downtown, it’s likely that you’re walking on a dead body. Many a graveyard was paved over to make way for wider roads and the grand homes that were built in the 19th century. With its Spanish moss-covered trees, Savannah is said to be one of the most haunted cities in America.  It was no wonder, then, when I heard that the Hamilton-Turner House, now an inn that was built in 1873, was one of the models for Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion.

The Hamilton-Turner Inn is a beautiful Second Empire-style home built on Lafayette Square and was the first home in Savannah to have electricity. The original owner was the president of the local electric company, and it is said that a crowd gathered outside the home to watch the lights turn on, thinking that the home would explode.  It is also one of many Savannah homes rumored to have a resident ghost.  The story that is heard most often is of a Confederate soldier who roams the halls. The only explanation given for why a Confederate soldier haunts a home built after the Civil War is that the house was built on top of his grave.

Its Second Empire architecture is naturally given to creepiness and made the HM rumor unsurprising. The Addams Family home, the Munsters’, and the Bates home in Psycho are all Second Empire.  I wanted to look into this connection further between the Hamilton-Turner House and the Haunted Mansion.

I did not believe that the current version of the HM was based on the Hamilton-Turner House, as the HM looks more akin to a Louisiana plantation style, even though we know the home is based on the Shipley-Lydecker House in Baltimore.  I turned, instead, to the pre-Ken Anderson drawings to the designs of Harper Goff in the 1950’s.

The coincidences between the two homes began to build. The current Haunted Mansion at DL is on New Orleans Square, while the Hamilton-Turner House is on Lafayette, named after the French nobleman the Marquis de Lafayette. Both homes, then, are located on French-influenced squares.  The original design and the Hamilton-Turner House are located next to churches and in cities with a long connection to the dead.

I reached out to the Hamilton-Turner Inn to get their take on the tale.  Suzy Ridder, the inn’s General Manager, said that she has heard the rumor before but she doesn’t know whether it’s true.  She said she could see the similarities between the Haunted Mansion and the Hamilton-Turner House, but the one thing that was actually similar is the fountain outside each of the homes.

haunted savannah 2
Hamilton-Turner House, Savannah, Georgia

haunted savannah 3
Haunted Mansion, Disneyland, California

I looked into the matter further, to see if I could find more associations.  I found a few dubious sources, such as an Examiner.com article that said the name of the Haunted Mansion home was the Hamilton, and aCNN iReport that said Walt himself sat on a bench in front of the Hamilton-Turner and sketched it. Denise Hildreth’s novel, Savannah From Savannah mentions the story in its pages.

The rumor can be found at the website for the Association of Historic Inns of Savannah, where it says that it was “informally the model for the ‘Haunted Mansion’ at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida.”  I figured the website meant Disneyland and not Walt Disney World as non-Disney fanatics often don’t realize that there are differences between the two resorts. They think the rides look the same on both coasts (I wonder how many people know that even the castles are different?).

haunted savannah 4
Haunted Mansion, Disney World, Florida

I reached out to people in Savannah, contacting the three most popular tour companies in order to find out what they knew. Garry Patrick, Program Manager of Ghosts and Gravestones, a subsidiary of the Old Town Trolley tour company, said that he had heard of the rumor but that the house was not a part of their tour program.

Adam Wilkins of Oglethorpe Tours had also heard the story, but he believed it would “make sense that this inn was used as [Walt’s] inspiration.”  He went on further to say that “Walt Disney did, briefly, consider Hutchinson Island [an island off of Savannah’s coast] as a location for Disney World,” but that it wasn’t large enough to accommodate his vision.

The last tour operator to whom I reached out was the Old Savannah Tour Company, which propagates this rumor according to a chat I found on DoomBuggies.com (among other sources stating that tour guides continue to give this info), but my inquiry went unanswered.

I contacted Jeff Baham of DoomBuggies.com to ask him further questions about the Haunted Mansion and the possible connection with the Hamilton-Turner House.  He did not have a definitive answer for Harper Goff’s inspiration, though he imagined that Mr. Goff would have looked at many places and sketched his designs based on something real. In regards to the Hamilton-Turner House, however, all rumors he has heard are false.

Convinced by a Haunted Mansion expert that the story, as fun as it was, was fabricated, I went back to search for the source. The only real connection I found was in the official tour guide handbook published by the city of Savannah. Parts of The Haunted Mansion film were shot in Savannah (though not at the inn), but I knew the rumor was older than 2003. Beyond that, the only mention of the Hamilton-Turner House within the guide was that it was the first in town to have electricity. The similarities between the two haunted homes began to unravel.

The long-established name of the Haunted Mansion home, though not necessarily considered canon, is the Gracey Mansion, not the Hamilton, thus debunking the Examiner.com article.  On the same message board where I found the Old Savannah Tour Company tip, I found a name for a person who might have begun the rumor, a woman named Nancy Hillis. This tale suddenly began to make sense. Like all good Savannah stories, the Haunted Mansion rumor begins with “the Book.”

There is only one book in Savannah known simply as the Book, and surprisingly it’s not the Bible. It’s John Berendt’s Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, a tell-all of Savannah in the 1980’s that Clint Eastwood turned into a film starring John Cusack and Kevin Spacey in 1997. If you live in Savannah for any amount of time, you will somehow become linked to the Book without even trying. I moved to Savannah in 2003 and left when I went off to college in 2007. In those four short years, I learned that one of my favorite diners was a common meeting place in the Book; a story is recounted in the pages of when the protagonist, Jim Williams, had a run-in with my synagogue when he placed Nazi flags on his house, which is right across the square from my temple (though he only placed the flags in order to stop a film crew from shooting a made-for-TV movie about Lincoln’s assassination in front of his home).  I went to high school with the grandson of Jim Williams’ archenemy and neighbor, and my school was also mentioned in the Book. I moved to Savannah 20 years after the novel’s events, and somehow my life can be found in its pages.

John Berendt changed Nancy Hillis’ name to Mandy, and the character became John Cusack’s love interest in the film. In reality (and in the novel), she was the girlfriend of Joe Odom, a man who knew how to have a good time and who threw the most raucous parties. Hillis owned the Hamilton-Turner House in the 1990’s.

I was once told by an employee at the Andrew Low House, another stately mansion located on the same square as the Hamilton-Turner House (and where I worked for one summer), that there is no need to tell false stories in Savannah as all the best ones are true, but passing off tales as the truth seems to be a Savannah pastime. Nancy Hillis was no exception. She falsely claimed many times that she was once Miss Tennessee, and was successfully sued for it, and it seems that she was the one who began the Haunted Mansion rumor in order to drum up business for her failed venture.

I asked a Manager of the Hamilton-Turner Inn if she knew if the Haunted Mansion tale had originated with Nancy Hillis, and she said that she had never heard of that.  When pressed for more information about Ms. Hillis, the Manager reiterated the Miss Tennessee story that I had found in prior research, implying that Ms. Hillis was prone to making up stories.

I dug through the archives of the Savannah Morning News and found an article in their Accent Diversionssection from July 15, 1994 titled “Haunted Mansion Mystery Show Begins At Hamilton-Turner House.” Hamilton-Turner produced an interactive murder mystery play in the 90’s based off the success of the Book, titled Murder in the Garden of Good and Evil. Though there is no mention of the connection between the Hamilton-Turner House and the Haunted Mansion, listings can be found for the following weeks announcing the program as the Haunted Mansion Mystery Shows.  This must be around the time when the rumor began. Savannahians saw a story and ran with it—what was once a murder mystery play at the Hamilton-Turner house called the Haunted Mansion turned into the Hamilton-Turner House becoming the basis for the Haunted Mansion, and I wouldn’t be surprised if Nancy Hillis supported such a rumor.

With just a little digging, the truth behind the Haunted Mansion tale was not too hard to find. The story, in some way, originated with Nancy Hillis and quickly became Savannah legend.  Ironically, the Savannah Morning News says the reason the victim was murdered in the Hamilton-Turner House’s Haunted Mansionplay was because “he made up stories about the city.”

Do you like a good ghost story? Then you’d probably love Savannah! Although it’s highly unlikely that the city inspired Disney’s Haunted Mansion, you’d be hard pressed to find a town which evokes the beautiful eeriness of the Haunted Mansion better than Savannah, GA.

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<3 Anna

Haunted House In Kentucky

Haunted House In Kentucky

Or, Peek Inside The Haunted Spirit House

Visit the original article here. Or continue reading for the full story.

Mystery Monday: Haunted House in Scott County

Written by Lex18.com in Dec. 2014

haunted kentucky

Nestled in Scott County is what appears to be a normal house, wonderfully decorated for Christmas.  But lurking inside is a secret.  Well, not necessarily a secret since it’s known around the county to be haunted.

The homeowners are used to it, but there’s proof that at one point, whoever lived there before was certainly frightened by whatever mystery was hiding between the walls.

Homeowner Dean Jessie says that if you just stick around long enough, anyone will be able to see why it is refereed to as The Spirit House. “I would say 3 or 4 times a week it could be in the daytime or the or it could be in the evening that you would experience the spirits in this house,” says Jessie. He’s lived there for ten years and says that he’s not alone. Jessie claims that there are five spirits there with him; a man in the basement, two maids, a little girl on the third floor and … Maggie.

“She built this house. This is her dream, and I could understand why she would be attached to this house,” said Jessie about Maggie.

But there are some things in his house that even Jessie doesn’t understand.  There are rooms that were completely sealed off, staircases leading to the third floor that were removed and bizarre markings above every single door. Jessie describes the markings as “ancient symbols for protection from evil spirits.” He’s convinced that there was something that happened there that everyone was afraid of and that’s what’s keeping the mystery in this house in Scott County.

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Abandoned Haunted Pub Nobody Wants To Buy

Abandoned Haunted Pub Nobody Wants To Buy

Or, How To Buy A Piece Of British History

Visit the original article here. Or continue reading below for the full story.

Abandoned Pub Nobody Wants To Buy Because Of Ghost Of Black-Eyed Girl

Written by Matt Payton in Oct. 2014

4 crosses pub.jpg

You can take your pick – a drunk ghost called Charlie, a heartbroken damsel called Emily, a Roundhead soldier spirit or a black eyed little girl dressed in rags..

This menagerie of poltergeists live in the now abandoned Staffordshire pub, the Four Crosses which dates back to 1636.

This property with its 10 bedrooms and a car park with a capacity for 80 vehicles will set you back a value-laden £325,000.

If you are interested and have children, just make sure none of them ‘can see dead people.’

Chris Arnold, who runs ghost-themed events said of the haunted pub: ‘I have hosted events at haunted buildings throughout the country and I have to say the Four Crosses Inn is probably the most haunted.

‘We have experienced so much there but a piano playing by itself on command was the most dramatic.’

 

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